Smarter Targets

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Smart Targets

When setting yourself a target or objective you will want to make sure your goals are SMART in order to give them the best chance of being successful.

Here is what is involved in a SMART target.

Specific – What you want to achieve exactly. Not vague, as vague targets are not easy to define as successful. A good goal statement will explain the who, what, why, where, when of a goal.

Measurable – You must be able to measure the result of your goal and track progress. Your goal must answer the questions how much? or How many? How will I know when I have achieved my goal?

Agreed – The goal must be agreed with the stakeholders and be relevant to them. Some examples of the people that you might agree your goal on could be your line manager, employees and customers.

Realistic –  It is important to make sure that your goal is realistic and relevant to your company. Although your goals should be stretching you should make sure that the steps required to achieve your goal are realistic and well within your control. Is it achievable?

Time – Bound – The goals you set yourself or your group or others must have a deadline. Your goal statement must answer the question when will I achieve my goal? Without adding time limits it’s easy to leave goals behind and not come back to them. It may also be a good idea to set milestones, especially with larger and longer projects a as it will break it up and allow you to keep record of weather you are on track for finishing on time or not.

 

Smarter Targets

Smarter targets are a great way of making sure you project your goals and objectives are traceable, relevant, that there are enough resources to achieve them, and there is a definite delivery deadline.

There are seven steps to help you set SMARTER goals for your projects.

These steps make up the word SMARTER when you put them together. They include the following:

Specific – What you want to achieve exactly. Not vague, as vague targets are not easy to define as successful. A good goal statement will explain the who, what, why, where, when of a goal.

Measurable – You must be able to measure the result of your goal and track progress. Your goal must answer the questions how much? or How many? How will I know when I have achieved my goal?

Agreed – The goal must be agreed with the stakeholders and be relevant to them. Some examples of the people that you might agree your goal on could be your line manager, employees and customers.

Realistic –  It is important to make sure that your goal is realistic and relevant to your company. Although your goals should be stretching you should make sure that the steps required to achieve your goal are realistic and well within your control. Is it achievable?

Time – Bound – The goals you set yourself or your group or others must have a deadline. Your goal statement must answer the question when will I achieve my goal? Without adding time limits it’s easy to leave goals behind and not come back to them. It may also be a good idea to set milestones, especially with larger and longer projects a as it will break it up and allow you to keep record of weather you are on track for finishing on time or not.

Ethical –  Goals must sit comfortably in your moral compass. A lot of people resist acting unethically. Set goals that meet a high ethical standard.

Recorded – It is always best to write your goals down before working towards it. Your goal will have a much greater chance of success if it is visible. The recording is necessary for planning, reviewing and monitoring of progress.

Smarter Target example

 

Product Prices changing:

One smarter target I got set was to change the prices of some products on the website using word press. I got shown how to do one product and then I did the rest of them myself.

 

Specific – The objective was to change a set of products on the website from the wrong price to the correct price. And make sure that when you go into the site as a customer or as anyone for that matter then the correct price should be shown for you for those specific products.

Measurable –  I knew that I had around a page of products to update so that when I had finished doing all of them, then my object will have been met.

Agreed – I had to agree with my mentor that what I had changed the prices to were correct and that I was changing the right products.

Realistic – I gave myself enough time to complete the task as I didn’t anticipate it taking any longer that the time I set myself. I made sure that it was manageable and that I fully knew and understood how to change the prices, what prices I was changing them to and which products I was changing.

Time – Bound – I made sure I set a deadline which was a short amount of time as I didn’t think it would take that long. I also knew that the task was too short to set milestones.

Ethical –  I was comfortable in terms of being in my moral compass

Recorded –  I set up a slot in my calendar on Outlook so that I was keeping record of my task. However, no other planning was needed as it was a fairly small task.

 

 

 

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